Posts Tagged ‘Legacy’

Be Inspired by Oyaje Idoko

PM Added only… "Happiness is not something readymade. It comes from your own actions." Dalai Lama

"A smile is a gift for all around us, not to be kept by us; but to be given freely everyday to all you know see and pass by, No matter who or what they are feeling or look like. It is your duty your unwritten law! Your ambition for being put on this earth to make another person SMILE EVERY DAY – Gray Lawrence

The One Absolute Certainty in Life


Oyaje Idoko  If I could share 500 words to inspire, this is the important  wisdom  I’d want to pass along to others…

The two past consecutive weekends, I had to travel down to my  village for the funerals of two of my very dear cousins.

This experience had a profound impact on me and brought me down to earth, literally, as I further realized the futility of this life. It was a wakeup call and a reminder about what mattered most as we go through this journey called life. I have come to appreciate these long road trips to funerals as they allow me a time for deep meditation and assessment of my life and help me to think more about this inevitable end which we all must face some day.

I think about the life of the people we just lost. The huge impact they made that endeared them to us and motivated us to make this long trip to pay our last respect. I looked at the hundreds of people from all walks of life that had also made  time to embark on the long tedious journey to pay their last respects. I listened to the beautiful tributes made by friends, colleagues and family about how much the deceased had impacted their lives. We wept; we forgot why we were there momentarily and cracked jokes; we remembered and we wept again until the caskets were lowered and we heard the sounds of earth hitting the casket as the grave was covered. Then we felt some peace as we knew the final chapter of their lives was closed. The only thing that lives on, is the legacy they left behind: the impact they made on us and others while alive. The fond memories of the experiences we shared with them. It is Ernest Hemingway that said, “Every man’s life ends the same way. It is only the details of how he lived and how he died that distinguish one man from another.”

You know, death is one subject that very few feel comfortable to talk about. Most people shy away from this subject and hurriedly go through it when they have to yet it’s one of the few things in this world that is most definitely certain. No one is going to escape it which is why I describe is as the Absolute Certainty. So if death is so certain, we must ask ourselves, when we die, what sort of tributes will be given at our funeral? How many people will be willing to make sacrifices and inconvenience themselves to be at our burial? Why do we live with so much hatred and selfishness, hoarding so much wealth without helping others? How can we stand so much injustice without standing up to do something about it? Why do we treat our fellow man with so much contempt? Why do we keep putting off till tomorrow what we should do today: that class; that visit to a close relative or loved one we haven’t heard from in a long while; that phone call; that dream; that confession; that treat or promise for our children. Why do we refuse to give up that habit that has made us less what God made us to be? Why do we live as if we are never going to die?? Why?

As I reflected on all who have left this world, I realize that those who are still remembered are those who truly lived because of the impact they made on others while they were alive; Those who were deliberate about doing what was right regardless of the pain or pleasure they got out of it.  As for me, I have decided to hold on to the words of R.A. Salvatore from The Halfling’s Gem which said “I have come to know that death is an important thing to keep in mind — not to complain or to make melancholy, but simply because only with the honest knowledge that one day I will die can I ever truly begin to live.”

"Let a person radically alter his thoughts, and he will be astonished at the rapid transformation it will effect in the material conditions of his life. " Napoleon Hill

The most beautiful smiles are often the ones that once struggled though the tears.

The Power is from within, the choice is yours
Gray Lawrence




We can learn from our leaders of the past. Thomas Edison’s great optimism gives us a quintessential example of welcoming disaster. On a December night in 1914, fire broke out in the film room of Thomas Edison’s laboratory. As his assets were going up in smoke, it would seem that this sixty-seven-year-old man’s spirit would certainly be crushed. Instead he saw the fire and shouted to his son, “Where’s Mom? Go get her! Tell her to get her friends! They’ll never see a fire like this again!” Later, he said,

“You can always make capital out of disaster.
We’ve just cleared out a bunch of old rubbish.
We’ll build bigger and better on the ruins.”

Thomas Edison could not control the circumstances. Rather than being heartbroken to see his life’s work go up in flames, he chose to welcome the opportunity to start over. Edison, known for his overwhelming optimism, is an inspiration for us today.

Do you live with regrets?  Are you able to put regret behind you easily?

Regret Is Not Your Friend

There are two sides to regret.

The first side involves regret for actions or events we wish had not happened and we would like to take back. We have all said or done things we regret. We may get upset and say things that damage our relationships or we may do things that cause harm. For example, Tiger Woods may regret his unfaithful conduct in his marriage.

I have done many things over my life that I regret, from investing in a scam to getting involved in a risky business venture to help out a friend. However, my regrets are now infrequent. Why? I took the time to identify the main causes of my actions and rooted them out. I had to learn to take responsibility for my contribution to my own troubles and to make values-based decisions, conducting myself in way that leaves little room for regret.

What about you? Think about the times when you felt regret. Is there a common theme? Do behaviours or habits contribute to your regret? What new thoughts or action steps could reduce your feelings of regret for the things you have said or done?

For the most part, the first type of regret can be tempered by time.

The second side of regret involves regret for actions not taken. This is the sin of omission. We must take this side of regret even more seriously because we cannot alter time to retrieve things that were missed: the job we did not take, the investment we ignored, or the opportunity we let pass by. The list can be long.

When I achieved the milestone birthday of 50 years, I felt a greater sense of urgency about all the things I wanted to do, despite my plan to live to 100+. I knew that it was my time to take action.

With keen awareness that mortality is universal and non-negotiable, I want to encourage every individual reading this article to take a stand:

“Starting today, I will live my life without regret, especially as it pertains to activities I want to experience and outcomes I wish to realize in my life.”

Here are a few areas you might wish to consider avoiding missing out on (and then later regretting):

§ Attending your child’s recital or concert

§ Beginning a regular fitness program

§ Travelling to that place you have been dreaming about for years

§ Taking that course to upgrade your skills—perhaps even getting the degree you have been contemplating

§ Trying a new food

§ Taking time for yourself

§ Quitting a job you hate

§ Calling a friend to share coffee or lunch

§ Attending the presentation or concert of someone (or group) you enjoy

§ Writing the article, poem, or book you’ve had percolating for ages

§ Joining the community group you’ve been thinking about

Unless material goods are directly linked to what you want to do or become, please don’t focus on them here. Yes, you can keep a list of the “things” you want to own, but putting a new painting on your wall may not be as meaningful as taking a vacation and having quality time with your family.

When have you said, “If only I had…?” Think about it for a moment. What do you wish you had done or become? What are you going to do about it? At this point, remorse won’t get you where you want to go; forward action will. Forget your excuses and make a decision to live your life without regret.

A research study conducted on individuals over 70 years of age asked participants these questions:

“If you could live your life over again, what would you do differently? What do you regret?”

The responses showed the following results:

§ They would take more time for themselves.

§ How many times have we met people who dedicated their whole life to others, at the expense of their own needs and goals?

§ They would take more risks.

§ This is the “if only” part of regret. “If only I had bought the property, taken that job, said ‘no’ to…” and on the story goes.

§ They would dedicate themselves to a cause or purpose that would last beyond their lifetime.

§ What’s your legacy? What will you be remembered for? Will you even be remembered at all?

A life lived without regret is living on purpose and making a difference, whatever the context. How do you rank yourself on a scale of 1 to 10? [1 = Poor (plenty of regret); 10 = Excellent (little or no regret)]

Let’s all strive to be as close to 10 as we can in all areas of our lives! Start now. No regrets, please!


1. List events in the past that have caused you to experience the most regret.
Is there a common theme or set of situations where regret is recurring for you? What do you think the root cause(s) might be? What can you do to reduce your regret?

2. Think about all the things you regret not
What are your reasons for not taking action—lack of courage, not feeling worthy, compromising your values for others, etc.?

3. Make a list of things you can start doing immediately to reduce your regrets.
Don’t make excuses for what you can’t do. Focus on what you can and will

4. Make a commitment to follow your list of actions.

5. Move on with confidence.

6. Confirm your passions and connect with your purpose to reduce your regrets.

7. Read my newest book, The Quest For Purpose. It will take you on a personal journey of discovery to help you confirm and affirm your passions in life.

8. Benchmark your gifts, talents, and passions by using CRG’s assessments.
Your results will assist you to establish your beliefs with confidence, and increase your passion in all areas of your life.

Remember, our mortality is guaranteed. To those of you who are still procrastinating, I suggest you get started with your no-regrets philosophy this very moment. When you have no regrets, then you are truly living On Purpose!

Gray Lawrence

“The point is not to live without any regrets it is to not hate ourselves for having them..” Gray Lawrence

Be inspired by Mahisha Dellinger

PMA Added…

A positive mental attitude is an irresistible force that knows no such thing as an immovable body.
Time and again we hear stories about ordinary people who do seemingly impossible things when they find themselves in an emergency situation. They perform Herculean feats of strength and endurance, things they never dreamed they were capable of doing. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if you could harness that strength and make it available anytime you need it? You can — if you believe you can. No doubt you can remember a time in your life when you were exceptionally focused on your objective, a time when you achieved more in less time than ever before. Perhaps it was an impending vacation that motivated you to get everything done before you departed, or perhaps it was a “must pass” exam that helped you focus your concentration. The intensity that you developed in those situations is always available to you when you have a Positive Mental Attitude. – Napoleon Hill



How You Can Choose Wealth Over Riches

Abundance, Success, Wealth

If I could share 500 words to inspire, this is the important wisdom I’d want to pass along to others…

I’m proud of my financial position in life, but contrary to what a lot of people may think, I never aspired to be rich. I wanted to be wealthy. It wasn’t always that way, though. I think there was a lot of fear driving me. Fear of being poor again and fear of going back to that impoverished life from my childhood.

Being rich and being wealthy seem to be synonymous with success. However, there’s a big difference between the two. The main difference between being rich and being wealthy is knowledge. Wealthy people know how to make money, while rich people only have money. Rich people are motivated by money, but wealthy people are motivated by their dreams, purpose and passion. Most rich people make a lot of money with their pay checks but the moment they stop working, they also stop making money. Wealth, true wealth, is often generational money and money that works for you.

Most people do want to be rich. We want to enjoy the fruits of their labour and live a life that is more fortunate and ultimately extravagant than the average man. We dream of having the nice things. These are things that everyone wants, but very few actually achieve. Essentially, it comes down to the person and their mind-set. It also comes down to their purpose, motivation and will power. It’s never the ones that are just motivated by money, it’s the ones who are motivated to change the world and build a legacy because that is what wealth really is.

Your ability to cultivate desire and take persistent action is what will make you successful, not your natural talents. It’s all about consistent daily action. Wealthy and rich people both may experience downfalls and failures in their ventures. However, wealthy people are knowledgeable when it comes to money matters and can start all over again and build wealth over time.

The key to acquiring wealth is to regularly monitor and increase your passive and portfolio income by increasing your means to earn and decreasing your expenses. The moment you decide to make passive and portfolio income a part of your financial habit and discipline yourself in building it, you are on your way to financial freedom.

This is the path in maintaining a strong wealth foundation. Never forget that what you do on a daily basis determines your habits, and your habits determine who you are, what you accomplish, and the legacy you leave. People will measure you by what you do and what you have managed to accomplish in your lifetime, which then of course leads to your legacy.

If you have inspired people and they can share and tell your story for generations to come, then you have created wealth in your life. You have left a legacy. You have done something different – you didn’t settle for simply being rich.

I don’t work for my money. It works for me. That’s the key to separating the wealthy from the rich. While I am still working diligently on my plan to independent wealth, I am confident I am on the right path. Which path will you choose?


"Give every person more in use value than you take from them in cash value."
Wallace Wattles (1860-1911)
The Science of Getting Rich

I never see failure as failure, but as the path I will not take in the further journey towards my greatness.

 Gray Lawrence

 Independent Distributor (UW)

We are still masters of our fate. We are still captains of our souls. Winston Churchill

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Gray Lawrence

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