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Is life simple or can you make it so.

"The greatest power we have is the power of choice. It’s an actual fact that if you’ve been moping in unhappiness, you can choose to be joyous instead and, by effort, lift yourself into joy. If you tend to be fearful, you can overcome that misery by choosing to have courage. Even in darkest grief you have a choice – The whole trend and quality of anyone’s life is determined in the long run by the choices that are made." Norman Vincent Peale

Life is a roller coaster with ups and downsWhen we were young life was easier, right? I know sometimes it seems that way. But the truth is life still is easy. It always will be. The only difference is we’re older, and the older we get, the harder we make things for ourselves.

You see, when we were young we saw the world through simple, hopeful eyes. We knew what we wanted and we had no biases or concealed agendas. We liked people who smiled. We avoided people who frowned. We ate when we were hungry, drank when we were thirsty, and slept when we were tired.

As we grew older our minds became gradually disillusioned by negative external influences. At some point we began to hesitate and question our instincts. When a new obstacle or growing pain arose, we stumbled and fell down. This happened several times. Eventually we decided we didn’t want to fall again, but rather than solving the problem that caused us to fall, we avoided it all together.

As a result, we ate comfort food and drank alcohol to numb our wounds and fill our voids. We worked late nights on purpose to avoid unresolved conflicts at home. We started holding grudges, playing mind games, and subtly deceiving others and ourselves to get ahead. And when it didn’t work out, we lived above our means, used lies to cover up lies, and ate and drank some more just to make ourselves feel better again.

Over the course of time, we made our lives harder and harder, and we started losing touch with who we really are and what we really need.

If you’re nodding your head, then you understand the need for Getting Back to Happy.

Because you want to get back to feeling:

Strong people don't put others down they lift them upEffective. Confident. Energetic. Successful. Connected. Clear-headed. Courageous. Attractive. Comfortable in your skin. Free from addictions and habits that hold you back. Free from toxic relationships. Propelled by a sense of purpose. Secure in your zone of inner, creative genius. Driven by your true potential to the point of realizing your dreams. Awakened to the positive changes you’re making in your life and the lives around you on a major scale. Slim, trim, and uninterested in French fries.

Seriously, how many times have you wished these qualities would just wash over you, and that you’d wake up one day as an unstoppable version of YOU?

If you’re like we were, you’ve lost count.

Wandering around aimlessly for years, individually, not knowing what to do, or how to get back on track. We just wanted a program to help us feel alive and powerfully human (without the need for alcohol, pills and junk food), and show how to serve ourselves and the people we love in the biggest and best way possible.

Green globe white mapToday that program exists! So can you promise something?

We know you have a big purpose and lots of potential to bring to the world. Let’s promise: No more wishing. No more reading self-help books and listening to inspiring podcasts and never taking action. No more days, weeks and months flying by while you stay stuck in the same exact uncomfortable place you’ve been for years. This is your time, and “Getting Back to Happy is your turning point.”

 

 

If you focus on what you left behind you will never be able to see what lies ahead

Gray Lawrence

Ambitious & Successful Networker

The yellow brick road "is" paved with Gold all you have to do is open the right door in your mind & take the first step. – Gray Lawrence

Be Inspired by Ernest Oriente

PMA added….

Great achievement is born of a struggle.
Our strength grows out of our weakness, said Ralph Waldo Emerson. “Not until we are pricked and stung and sorely shot at, awakens the indignation which arms itself with secret forces.” Strife and struggle can inspire you to overcome adversity and to propel yourself to real achievement. View every struggle as an opportunity for personal growth. It is the struggle itself, not the result that builds character. If you know you are right, stay the course even though the whole world seems to be against you and everyone you know questions your judgment. When you prevail — and you eventually will if you stick to the job — they will all tell you that they knew all along you could do it.  – Napoleon Hill

 

Let Your Genius Work For You!

 

Ernest OrienteIf I could share 500 words to inspire, this is the important wisdom I’d want to pass along to others…

Do you know what genius work is?

As a leader within your company, are you spending today doing genius work… the kind of work that is the most valuable and best use of your time? Genius work can be defined as a peak performance state-of-mind.

This means that when you are immersed in the genius work you most love and you are working on the projects that require your maximum attention, the results will be world-class! Doing genius work also means that you are focusing on the activities and the action steps that will deliver high impact results, on both a professional and personal level.

Defining Genius Work
“If I could only focus on two key areas today, what would the most valuable and best use of my time be?”

This is the easiest and fastest way to define genius work. As a leader in your company, genius work might include an important interview to hire a new Superstar, a presentation to your Board of Directors on your financial performance or meeting with a new strategic alliance partner. Here is the key principle regarding genius work: your genius work can only be done by you.

Defining I Wish Projects
Once you have made a list of the professional activities that you consider genius work, make a list of every activity and/or project you are working on this week and month. Then, split this list into two separate lists… an “I Wish” list and a “Delegation” list.

Your I Wish list is best explained as the activities/projects that require your attention, but could be done by someone else if you spent 30-90 minutes to show this person the necessary steps. For instance, your genius work might include an important final interview for a new Superstar who wants to join your company. The I Wish step would include having first and second interviews done by others within your company and showing your assistant how to do reference checks.

When working with our coaching clients, their I Wish list is always a large and long list. During our weekly coaching calls, we focus on removing every single activity/project on their I Wish list…so they can gain an additional 10-20 hours per week of free time to spend doing the things they most love. Some clients are now taking monthly vacations, some are semi-retired and others are spending more time with their families.

Defining Delegation Work
Delegation work is the easiest to explain. These are the activities/projects that can quickly be completed and only require 30-60 seconds of explanation. For example, your assistant can make copies of a presentation you are giving, your sales director can bring the results of his/her results to your next executive meeting, or your secretary can make a call to have your copier repaired. These are all one-step requests and can be easily delegated to those who work on your team.

Ready to live the life you always dreamed about? Let your “Genius” work for you professionally and personally!

There is always a shortage of people who get the job done on time without excuses or grumbling.
If you really study those who have reached the top of any organization, you will find that they are the people who cheerfully accept challenges, take the initiative, and get the job done. They don’t complain, and they don’t make excuses. Those who never get anywhere in their jobs and careers can’t seem to understand that achievers don’t become achievers after they reach the top. They reached the top because of the way they conducted themselves along the way. You can easily become one of those individuals who regularly advance in the organization — if you are willing to pay the price. Any good manager will tell you that the type of people who are most in demand are those who can think for themselves, who will take the initiative to do the right thing without being told, and who will stick to the job until it is finished. You can be one of those people if you choose to be. Napoleon Hill

From The Secret Daily Teachings

To understand the power and the magic of gratitude, you have to experience it for yourself. So why not begin by deciding to find 100 things a day to be grateful for? If you practice gratitude every day it won’t take long before gratitude is your natural state of being, and when that happens you will have unlocked one of the greatest secrets to life.     May the joy be with you, Rhonda Byrne

Gray Lawrence

Ambitious & Successful Networker

Life is The Sum of All Our Choices – Albert Camus

Network Marketing How to meet anyone anywhere

This I have had for a while from connections in the USA. The messages are as per the person whom said them, enjoy and I hope learn something..
No one is capable of giving direction unless he or she knows how to take directions and carry them out.
An essential quality of leadership is developing the ability to persuade others to align their goals with yours and those of the organization. Until you, yourself, are able to join forces with others in the pursuit of a common objective, you will never persuade them to join your cause. Effective leaders recognize the value of working together, and they learn how to follow directions before being entrusted with the responsibility for the performance of others. Good leaders show by example how they expect others to behave. Even though the troops may be trained to follow orders unquestioningly, the officer always leads them into battle. You cannot push others to follow your example; you must pull them along with you. When you show by your every word and deed that you are a person of character, one who works for the greater good of the entire organization, your people will follow. – Napoleon Hill

24 Tricks for Terrible Networkers (or How to Meet Anyone Anywhere)

Although I regularly attend networking events, I’m a terrible networker and rarely yield my desired outcome. What are some ways in which I can improve my networking capabilities and results? — Margaret, Florida
1. Be a giver
Part of the awkward and uncomfortable feelings around networking result from being self-conscious.

If you’re more focused on learning about the person you’re talking to, you don’t have time to stress over whether you sound stupid or if you have lettuce in your teeth. Ask the question, “What do you need next? How can I support you?” You’ll feel more powerful and find common ground.

— Lisa Nicole Bell, Inspired Life Media Group
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2. Do your homework
Do some research on the attendees beforehand, if you can. That way, you can prepare for the event in much the same way you’d prepare for a job or informational interview. Draw up a list of questions specific to the people you’ll likely be speaking with. This will not only ease your anxiety, but will also help you establish strong, authentic connections.

— Steph Auteri, Career Coaching for Word Nerds
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3. Quality over quantity, always
What is your desired outcome? If you don’t know the answer to that, you’ll never achieve it. The idea isn’t to hand out the most business cards. The idea is to have the most meaningful conversations. Instead of having the goal of meeting everyone there, try targeting a select few people and have longer more meaningful conversations rather than worrying about who to talk to next.

— Adam Gilbert, My Body Tutor
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4. Use the internet to alleviate networking anxiety
If you’re afraid or uncomfortable with networking, then use the internet to find people who share your interests and slowly move that relationship offline. The internet allows you to meet people in the comfort of your home, which will alleviate networking stress and time from your already busy entrepreneurship schedule.

— Dan Schawbel, personalbranding.com
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5. Listen and learn
Rather than start a conversation talking about yourself, why not show a curiosity in others, and listen first? Let them start talking about their projects and work experience, and pay attention to what they do to make you feel at ease and engaged. Reflect on that after the event and apply what you noticed next time you start a convo!

— Tammy Tibbetts, She’s the First
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6. The power of the short and simple pitch
Develop a short and simple introduction pitch that describes what you do and why you do it. It should give someone a quick and easy idea of the features and benefits of your company. Practice makes perfect. Repeat your brand statement often to friends, colleagues and new associates. Put it into action at your next event and proudly share your vision with confidence.

— Erica Nicole, YFS Magazine: Young, Fabulous & Self Employed
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7. The silver bullet
The Silver Bullet is hard work. Practice, Practice, Practice makes perfect. Look at the people who you admire with networking capabilities, what do you like about them? Can you practice doing those things? The best book to read on this topic was written 100 years ago by Dale Carnegie, How to Win Friends and Influence People. They even have live classes that you can take to practice networking.

— Louis Lautman, Young Entrepreneur Society
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8. Make it a game
Try turning the networking experience into a game. Go with a friend, and then set challenges for each other. “I challenge you to go up and introduce yourself to that closed-off group of people.” “I challenge you to get that guy’s business card.” Etc. It’s amazing how something so simple can take the pressure off and allow you to be yourself, but also creative in your approach to networking.

— Colin Wright, Ebookling
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9. Make people feel great
Take Maya Angelou’s advice and remember that after the event, most people probably won’t remember what you do or what you said, but they will remember how you made them feel. Make them feel great about themselves, their business and what they do and you’ll have made the all-important first connection, upon which you can build.

— Lea Woodward, Kinetiva
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10. Change your mindset
Rather than talking about yourself and constantly thinking “What can this person do for me?” re-frame the experience completely. Make it a goal to meet cool people, and help them in anyway possible through your business or contacts, and develop long lasting friendships. The benefits, even though they may be months or years down the line, will follow.

— Matt Mickiewicz, 99designs
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11. What is your desired outcome?
Be intentional about networking. Entrepreneurs don’t have time or patience for small talk. We want to dig into your soul and discover who you are within five minutes of meeting you. And we want you to do the same with us. Know what you want from each person you approach, and be forward about it. If they can’t or aren’t willing to help, say, “It was nice meeting you” and move on.

— Nicholas Tart, 14 Clicks
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12. It’s only the beginning
Remember when you step into the event, it’s only the beginning. The end goal (of the event) is not to ink a deal, but to put yourself in a position where you can connect with that person again at a less crowded, less noisy future date. That means you have to follow-up and keep showing up. Be of a service mind set. Listen to their story and think about who in your network they should meet.

— Michael Bruny, runthepoint.com
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13. Be something memorable
Part of creating your personal brand is coming up with that “thing” that makes people remember you. When networking you want it to be the same way. Maybe it’s the tie you wear or the sneakers with the suit. Or maybe it is a specific conversation you want to have. But just be you. Then when you follow up, you can have an instant conversation starter based on your memorable action or trait.

— Greg Rollett, Radically Ambitious
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14. Don’t think about networking at a networking event
The best way to create anything meaningful at an event is to cut off all thoughts that you’ll be “networking” with people. That will stress you out and make you nervous. Focus on being EXACTLY who you are, always offer a helpful suggestion to others (“have you thought of X to improve Y?”) and listen as much as you can. People love to talk about themselves so listening will get you in good books.

— Ishita Gupta, fearlessstories.com
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15. Introverts must be more creative
If you’re less of a face-to-face networker and more of an introvert, it’s difficult to make those one-on-one connections with others. That’s why you have to get creative to make an impact. Design a business card that demands attention, wear something memorable, or even do something out of the ordinary that will leave people talking.

— Logan Lenz, Endagon
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16. Get in the game
You can’t hit a home run from the bench. Be proactive and start conversations with others. Ask open-ended questions, people love nothing more than talking about themselves. Balance your time carefully between listening and talking. Most importantly, follow-up with the connections made to the transform an initial meeting to a long lasting business relationship.

— Anthony Saladino, Kitchen Cabinet Kings
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17. Follow up to get through
There are lot of great verbal seductionists out there, but the first and best way to separate talk from talent is follow up. Few people go the extra step to deliver on their promises or even just send a friendly note. The common story is getting “caught up” or having “no time.” But uncommon individuals makes time for networking with the understanding that action is more important than words.

— Kent Healy, The Uncommon Life
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18. It just takes one
For many people, networking events can be overwhelming. Letting yourself focus on just meeting one new person at an event can be enough, especially if you’re having difficulties making connections with everyone present. Ideally, you can check up on who will be at the next event beforehand, so you can choose that one perfect person, but even if you can’t, one good connection is worth your time.

— Thursday Bram, Hyper Modern Consulting
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19. Smile!
If you’re putting to much pressure on yourself to yield a specific outcome, you might rob yourself of an opportunity to have fun, practice the art of conversation and get to know people. Start with a smile! You’d be surprised at how far it takes you. From there, focus on asking the other person questions that get *them* to smile — it will leave a memorable mark and you’ll build real connections.

— Jenny Blake, Life After College
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20. Attend events where you feel comfortable for the best networking results
It may be time to re-think where you spend your time. Networking can happen anywhere-I’ve met potential clients at grocery stores, photocopy centers, coffee shops and parties. Choose a few events such as a sports team or an arts group where you really enjoy yourself and then as you build relationships with people, you can naturally share with them about what you do.

— Elizabeth Saunders, Real Life E®
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21. Set a measurable goal
Instead of going into an event with the mere desire of “networking,” set a clear goal of what you’re hoping to achieve out of attending. Do you aim to meet three new people at the event? Do you want to connect with a certain type of individual? If you cannot come up with a measurable goal, perhaps the event is not worth your time.

— Heather Huhman, Come Recommended
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22. Don’t try so hard
I hate it when I’m at an event and I meet someone who’s trying to sell me on something. I like meeting authentic people. Don’t worry too much about pitching your business at these events. Just meet and mingle, talk about whatever is interesting, and leave with a business card. That’s it.

— Eric Bahn, Beat The GMAT
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23. Know whom to meet
Before each event look at the list of people attending and figure out who you want to meet. At small events you can easily find the organizer, if you know whom it is, who knows everyone and can continue to point you in the right direction. Even reach out beforehand via email or twitter so the first introduction isn’t as awkward.

— Jared O’Toole, Under30Ceo.com
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24. Remember names
I’m terrible at remembering names, but if I practice before and after any event, I do a much better job next time I see the person and it leave an impression on them by simply calling them by their first name. I read somewhere this was George W. Bush’s secret to power and I have to tell you it works.  — Timothy Sykes, Millionaire Media LLC

“I have found that helping people to develop personal goals has proven to be the most effective way to help them cope with problems. Observing the lives of people who have mastered adversity, I have noted that they have established goals and sought with all their effort to achieve them. From the moment they decided to concentrate all their energies on a specific objective, they began to surmount the most difficult odds.”

Your Vision of the future, lies from within

Gray Lawrence

The greatest freedom is to be responsible. –Lazaris

Seth Godin-You have no credibility (yet)

Credo for Success
Whatever the mind can conceive and believe the mind can achieve. – Napoleon Hill

A man I follow is the great Seth Godin, his blogs and messages are among the best!
You have no credibility (yet)

You believe you have a great idea, a hit record, a press release worth running, a company worth funding. You know that the customer should use your limited-offer discount code, that the sponsor should run an ad, that the admissions office should let you in. You know that the fast-growing company should hire you, and you’re ready to throw your (excellent) resume over the transom.

This is insufficient.

Your belief, even your proof, is insufficient for you to get the attention, the trust and the action you seek.

When everyone has access, no one does. The people you most want to reach are likely to be the very people that are the most difficult to reach.

Attention is not yours to take whenever you need it. And trust is not something you can insist on.

You can earn trust, just as you can earn attention. Not with everyone, but with the people that you need, the people who need you.

This is the essence of permission marketing.

When I began in the book industry thirty years ago, if you had a stamp, you had everything you needed to get a book proposal in front of an editor. You could send as many proposals as you liked, to as many editors as you liked. All you needed to do was mail them.

In my first year, after my first book came out, I was totally unsuccessful. Not one editor invested in one of the thirty books I was busy creating.

It wasn’t that the books were lousy. It was me. I was lousy. I had no credibility. I didn’t speak the right language, in the right way. Didn’t have the credibility to be believed, and hadn’t earned the attention of the people I was attempting to work with.

Email and other poking methods have made it easy to spew and spray and cold call large numbers of people, but the very ease of this behaviour has also made it even less likely to work. The economics of attention scarcity are obvious, and you might not like it, but it’s true.

The bad news is that you are not entitled to attention and trust. It is not allocated on the basis of some sort of clearly defined scale of worthiness.

The good news is that you can earn it. You can invest in the community, you can patiently lead and contribute and demonstrate that the attention you are asking be spent on you is worthwhile.

But, no matter how urgent your emergency is, you’re unlikely to be able to merely take the attention you want.

Do it now! Decide where you are going and how to get there. Then make a start from where you now stand. Napoleon Hill

Gray Lawrence Successful Networker

“Forget mistakes. Forget failure. Forget everything except what you’re going to do now and do it. Today is your lucky day. -Will Durant

The unknowable path Seth Godin

"Limitations live only in our minds. But if we use our imaginations, our possibilities become limitless." Jamie Paolinetti

The unknowable path

…might also be the right one.

The fact that your path is unknowable may be precisely why it’s the right path.

The alternative, which is following the well-lit path, offers little in the way of magic.

If you choose to make art, you are no longer following. You are making

Every marketing challenge revolves around these questions

WHO are you trying to reach? (If the answer is ‘everyone’, start over.)

HOW will they become aware of what you have to offer?

WHAT story are you telling/living/spreading?

DOES that story resonate with the worldview these people already have? (What do they believe? What do they want?)

WHERE is the fear that prevents action?

WHEN do you expect people to take action? If the answer is ‘now’, what keeps people from saying, ‘later’? It’s safer that way.

WHY? What will these people tell their friends?

Plenty more

One of the critical decisions of every career:

"Well, there’s plenty more to do, I’ll do the least I can here and then move on to the next one." vs.

"I only get to do this one, once. So I’ll do it as though it’s the last chance I’ll ever have to do this work, to please this customer, to ring this bell."

As little as possible. Or as much. The system might push you to become mediocre, but that very same system rewards excellence. The perception that the minimum is viable is built deep into our notion of productivity, but it turns out that the maximum is valuable indeed.

The biggest cause of excellence is the story we tell ourselves about our work. It’s a choice, a commitment and a lifelong practice.

You will rarely guess/create/cause #1

The breakthrough pop hit is so unpredictable that it’s basically random.

You will always do better with a rational portfolio of second and third place reliable staples than you will in chasing whatever you guess that pop culture will want tomorrow.

Of course, it means giving up hoping for a miracle and instead doing the hard work of being there for the people who count on you.

New times call for new decisions

Those critical choices you made then, they were based on what you knew about the world as it was.

But now, you know more and the world is different. So why spend so much time defending those choices?

We don’t re-decide very often, which means that most of our time is spent doing, not choosing. And if the world isn’t changing (if you’re not changing) that doing makes a lot of sense.

The pain comes from falling in love with your status quo and living in fear of making another choice, a choice that might not work.

You might have been right then, but now isn’t then, it’s now. If the world isn’t different, no need to make a new decision.

The only question, then, "is the world different now?"

 

Your vision is in Your Mind

Gray Lawrence Ambitious & Successful Networker

Life is The Sum of All Our Choices – Albert Camus

Revolving Map
Contact Information
Gray Lawrence

grayjl63@gmail.com

Skype: graynat71

Ph: +44 1522 691508
Mob:+44 7726591314
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